Our Kauri Forests need You!

There is no cure for Kauri dieback, and the disease kills most if not all the Kauri it infects. It can be spread by just a pinhead of soil, and you can’t tell by looking whether a tree is infected or not. Kauri dieback is threatening Kauri with functional extinction. But Kauri will be saved – by people like you.

Kauri are a cornerstone of the indigenous forests of Aotea, Great Barrier Island and the upper North Island of New Zealand. They are one of the largest and  longest-living tree species in the world… reaching ages of 1000 years-plus!
Mature trees have an average diameter of two metres.  The biggest can reach heights of over 50 metres, with girths of more than 13 metres. These beautiful giants of the forest  have existed as a species for around 20 million years.

What is Kauri dieback?

Phytophthora agathidicida, the pathogen that causes kauri dieback, was only discovered in 2009, and formally named in 2015 (previously it was known as Phytophthora taxon Agathis). The pathogen can sense a kauri tree’s roots, and swim towards them using a tail-like flagella.

How can I help save Kauri?

In general, you should always:

1: Clean all soil off your footwear and other gear, every time you enter or leave a forest/area with native trees, and at every cleaning station.

2: Use disinfectant only after you have removed all the soil. Stay on track and off Kauri roots.
A Kauri’s roots can grow outwards 3 x as far as its branches.

3: Spread the word within your networks on how to stop Kauri dieback.

Take a look at this very informative video… You’ll see just how easy it is to help save our Kauri!!

Kauri are naturally found throughout the upper North Island, in the Northland, Auckland. Waikato regions, in parts of the Bay of Plenty and on Great Barrier island. If you’re in natural bush and you’re in the upper North Island, it’s likely you’ll be near a Kauri.

For more information visit kauridieback.co.nz

Together –  We Can Save Our Kauri !

You can help fight Kauri Dieback
Great Barrier Island Tourism